The 15 Best Games Like Bloodborne

Image credit: FromSoftware

Bloodborne is an incredibly popular gothic-style action role-playing game that has amassed an army of fans all over the world, including me and many other fans of cosmic horror.

Like many others, I’ve been looking for games like Bloodborne that can offer me a similar experience to what I had with FromSoftware’s victorian horror title.

Fortunately, there are a few good options available out there. In this list, you will find 15 games like Bloodborne that you may want to check out if you’re also looking to get your adrenaline pumping while slashing some monsters up.

Whether you are looking for a game with similar gameplay, a similar setting, or both, I’m sure there will be at least one game here that will interest you. So please check the least below and find out which games are the most like Bloodborne.

Nioh

Not the game that is the most like Bloodborne, but this is just the first game on our list. Nioh is a Souls-like game and one of the best games set in Japan. Players take control of William, a Westerner who finds himself amid warring factions and supernatural forces back in the 1600s.

Much like in Bloodborne, combat is fast and brutal, with an emphasis on melee weapons. There are also a variety of armor and weapons to choose from, and each can have unique abilities and different moves.

One new feature that makes Nioh different than other titles on this list is its RPG leveling system. It can give players access to new moves and abilities by gaining experience points. As for the rest, it still has special attacks, a Stamina-like bar, and fast dodges with frames that make you invulnerable.

Nioh is not a horror game, but it is a souls-like with a distinct theme that sets it apart from games like Dark Souls and Demon’s Souls. For that reason, and for its faster combat, Nioh deserves to be mentioned in this list.

Blasphemous

Blasphemous is a punishing game that will have you feeling frustrated and accomplished in equal measure. It’s a game that’s not afraid to kill you and does so with relish.

The game is set in a dark, gothic world. In it, you take on the role of the Penitent One, who is a fallen crusader. As the Penitent One, you must absolve sins by defeating bosses inspired by real-world mythology. Blasphemous is difficult, but it’s also one of the most rewarding games you’ll ever play.

Suppose you’re looking for a game similar to Bloodborne in terms of its unforgiving nature or bizarre enemies. In that case, Blasphemous is definitely worth checking out.

Explore this dark, twisted religious realm to learn more about its numerous, deep secrets. To defeat the swarms of hideous enemies and colossal titans waiting to rip off your limbs one at a time, you must powerful attacks and merciless executions.

Find relics and arm yourself with them, as well as rosary beads and prayers that call on the forces of the gods to help you on your quest to avoid eternal damnation.

The Sinking City

This is not a souls-like game, but some locations and moments of this game do look a lot like Yharnam from time to time. This is most likely the case because both games draw inspiration from the same source.

The world created by H.P. Lovecraft, the Master of Horror, served as a basis for the open-world investigation and adventure game The Sinking City. In this game, supernatural entities seem to have gained control of the partially submerged metropolis of Oakmont. You are a private detective who decides to figure out what has been truly controlling the city and its citizens.

If you enjoyed Bloodborne for its Lovecraftian themes, there is a really high chance that you will enjoy this game.

The Sinking City’s open investigation structure makes it very replayable. Depending on the steps you take, each case might be addressed differently, leading to several outcomes. This is not the most well-polished game, but it surely can provide a fun time.

Remnant: From the Ashes

Remnant: From the Ashes is a third-person action survival shooter. It takes place in a post-apocalyptic world where an old evil has utterly destabilized the Earth.

Now, horrifying creatures have taken over the world that once belonged to us. As one of humanity’s last survivors, you’ll fight alone against legions of deadly foes and titanic monsters from another dimension while attempting to recover what once belonged to humankind.

This is a game where things are made to constantly feel fresh due to things frequently changing entirely every time you visit an area. When you go through one of its procedurally generated maps, new landscapes, enemies, quest options, and in-world events are created.

Each of the game’s four distinct worlds is teeming with horrific inhabitants and landscapes that present new difficulties with each run. Unlike most souls games, you can’t rely on knowing the map. It’s much more about adapting on the fly and exploring.

Hollow Knight

Hollow Knight is a Metroidvania video game developed and published by Team Cherry. The game follows a small, silent protagonist who enters the forgotten kingdom of Hallownest in search of answers.

Similar to dark souls, it features tough enemies that can kill you with just a few hits, a dark world, and a somewhat cryptic storyline. As you explore, new weapons and powers will be unlocked, allowing you to reach previously inaccessible areas.

Eventually, you’ll find a strange glowing key and learn about an ancient bug kingdom below your feet. Although this is, at least a first, a cute 2D game, Hollow Knight quickly reveals an ominous setting.

It’s always dark, it’s always raining, and there’s a constant sensation of sorrow and sadness no matter where you go. If that’s the kind of thing you enjoyed in Bloodborne and you like challenging 2D games, there is a good chance you will like Hollow Knight too.

Skautfold: Usurper

This game is a Metroidvania action RPG and is the answer to the question, “what would Bloodborne be like if it belonged to a different genre?” It seems that it’d be Skautfold: Usurper. It might not be one of the best Metroidvania games on Steam, but it is undoubtedly worth playing.

In this game, your task is to purge London of the terrors that the otherworldly Citadel unleashed, Eldritch monsters. Uncover the enormous Citadel and defeat the horrors hiding inside using the new “Guard” system, which rewards accurate play and expertise.

This game is a follow-up to Skautfold: Shrouded in Sanity. Although it is not required, playing the previous game is advised for a deeper understanding of the story, which is the franchise’s strongest suit. This is a genuine Metroidvania in which all aspects are greatly influenced by souls games. This game is challenging, but so is Bloodborne, so I doubt you are looking for an easy game.

There are several secrets, extra regions, and optional bosses to find if you’re seeking even more content. The Citadel is a vast and dynamic linked environment that you may play in any way you choose. There are innumerable shortcuts to find and a wide range of interesting locations, including human settlements, alien landscapes, expansive libraries, ethereal gardens, and more.

Skautfold: Shrouded in Sanity

Skautfold: Shrouded in Sanity claims to be a survival-horror game inspired by Resident Evil 1, Dark Souls, and Eternal Darkness. In other words, it is pretty much a Pixel version of Bloodborne. It might not have been that on purpose, but there is no game that nails that Lovecraftian action-RPG feel more than this one.

As you search among the aggressive residents for the answers, learn the mysteries of the estate. The enslaved people wandering the hallways developed a peculiar and nasty psychosis. They now attack at first sight because of their clearer understanding of cosmic insignificance.

The story is cryptic, as most souls-like games tend to be. You have a contract that demands that you find and destroy the cause of the unusual fog engulfing the Berelai Manor in the alternate historical period of 1897 Angelic Empire of Britannia.

As for the gameplay, Shrouded in Sanity is as much of a Souls-like game as pixel art games can be. In many ways, I did feel like playing a SNES demake of Bloodborne, and I mean that as a compliment.

Morbid: The Seven Acolytes

Morbid: The Seven Acolytes defines itself as a Horrorpunk Action RPG filled with Lovecraftian horrors and Cronenbergian gore. This might make one of the most gruesome takes on the isometric Souls-like genre.

It is like a higher-budget version of Skautfold: Shrouded in Sanity. It captures the aesthetics and atmosphere through excellent pixel art and sound design. The enemies are gruesome, the bosses are fascinating, and there are quite a few different areas to explore.

Unfortunately, although it tries, the game doesn’t have a lot of depth. The difficulty is not quite there, and some systems are easy to exploit, making the game much easier than intended.

Still, if you are looking for a Lovecraftian ambiance, Morbid: The Seven Acolytes delivers that “this looks kinda like Bloodborne” feeling that might be enough for you to enjoy the game.

Eldest Souls

Eldest Souls is a distinct boss rush souls game that is fast and brutally difficult. The Old Gods unleashed a tremendous Desolation on the planet as their ultimate act of retaliation. A lone warrior and his pure obsidian blade are humanity’s only remaining chance.

As you probably know by now, if we are talking about old gods in horror games, we are probably dabbing into some Lovecraftian creatures. Eldest Souls sounds and looks very much like something that would fit in the world of Bloodborne if that game was made in pixel art.

You’ll run into weird NPCs, fun missions, and a variety of terrifying secrets as you explore the maze-like corridors in pursuit of the Old Gods. That will cause you to gradually learn the truth about the Old Gods and their never-ending incarceration.

Every battle with the Old Gods offers a different set of obstacles and benefits. Each time one of them is defeated, you awaken special Talents and Abilities. These special skills will allow you to create countless unique combinations for your battle style.

Source of Madness

Source of Madness took me by surprise. It nails the tone and aesthetics of Lovecraftian horror to the point that it looks and feels like the craziest and most non-sensical parts of Bloodborne. It was this aesthetical aspect of Source of Madness that made me immediately made me interested in this game.

This game is a procedurally generated, gloomy side-scrolling action roguelike set in the macabre Clayland, which is very much based on the writings of H.P. Lovecraft and the kind of horror stories that derived from it.

Roguelites became a very popular genre. One can easily see the many games with procedurally generated maps that constantly appear on Steam. However, when well done, these aspects of a game marry very well into the Lovecraftian concepts. For instance, it works well with the idea of how one can’t usually see the real world and how doing so can lead you to a state of madness.

Source of Madness nails it very well. In this game, you take on the role of a new acolyte on a frightening adventure to reveal the cosmic mysteries of the Clay Earth and the enigmatic fortress on the moon, the Tower of Madness.

Demon’s Souls

Although Demon’s Souls is the original Souls game, Bluepoint remade the game. It became a PlayStation 5 exclusive title with graphics that are way beyond the PlayStation 4’s capabilities. However, this is not why this game is here.

In fact, Demon’s Souls is filled with cosmic horror. So much so that many fans thought that Bloodborne was a direct sequel to the original Souls game.

The events of Demon’s Souls take place in Boletaria, a nation that has been taken over by the Old One after it was freed via illegal Soul Arts. A hero is sent to assassinate Boletaria’s deposed monarch Allant and appease the Old One. You will be taking the role of that supposed hero and adventuring in this weird, punishing, dark fantasy world.

When playing Demon’s Souls, you will travel through five distinct worlds from a central location known as the Nexus. The game has a strong focus on challenging combat and systems, including player death and rebirth. However, this is nothing new to those who played Bloodborne.

The Surge

The Surge_20170515110051

The Surge is a souls-like sci-fi game that takes place in an apocalyptic setting. Although the premise might not feel too close to Bloodborne, this game’s combat might be much closer to it than Dark Souls will ever be.

In The Surge, you rely on melee weapons and a quick dodge that puts you at a safe distance from the attacker. This is much closer to Bloodborne’s combat than blocking with a shield and perfectly timing your rolls like you’d do when playing Dark Souls.

On top of that, The Surge has this really creepy vibe that constantly makes you feel like things are escalating for the worse, and all humans you meet have lost their minds or are about to.

In The Surge, you play Warren, a man who was rendered unconscious on his first day of work due to a horrific catastrophe. When awoken, Warren finds himself in a section of the structure that had been destroyed and wearing a cutting-edge exoskeleton.

After that, he realizes that rogue robots, crazy employees, and hazardous AIs want him dead. The game is focused on Warren’s fight for survival while he unveils what happened that caused the end of civilization as we know it.

Code Vein

By fusing Souls-like gameplay with a conventional JRPG plot and an anime style, Code Vein expands on the mechanics of Souls games. It delivers a combat system that can be both frantic and methodical.

Similar to Bloodborne, Code Vein emphasizes pattern recognition, fast-paced fighting, and well-timed dodges. It also has plenty of action-packed moments. However, it still has unique systems, such as the AI companion that helps you throughout the game.

Superficially speaking, Code Vein has some blood-related plot points. In this game, you have Revenants. They are humans who caught BOR parasites that turn them into superpowered vampires. The catch is that Revenants frequently lose the memory of their past selves. To keep from becoming the Lost, a depraved ghoul that acts like an animal, they must ingest human blood.

Many people refer to this game as the “anime souls-like,” and they are probably right. The narrative of Code Vein is not as gloomy and horrifying as that in Bloodborne, and the setting feels very different from Yharnam. Still, you might find enough mechanical similarities to keep you interested.

Pascal’s Wager: Definitive Edition

Pascal’s Wager is a game that feels a lot like Bloodborne. You’re constantly on the move, fighting enemies with various weapons and abilities in a souls-like gameplay style. The game is also set in a dark and foreboding gothic world, full of deadly creatures that want nothing more than to kill you.

This game is not among the most challenging souls-like titles I’ve played. If you’re looking for a game that will keep you on your toes, Pascal’s Wager might not be it. However, it does have a lot of action, loads of secrets to find, and lots of replayability.

Regarding its visuals and setting, Pascal’s Wager might not be quite as striking as Bloodborne. However, especially after learning this was first a mobile game, I actually find this game quite enjoyable.

The game also has a bunch of playable characters and a good soundtrack. It also helps that the game seems to get much better as you advance. Pascal’s Wage is far from perfect, but it’s a cheap experience that is, most likely than not, very close to what you are looking for in this list.

Dark Souls 3

games like sekiro Dark Souls

Dark Souls 3 is the last game about the Age of Fire and the consequences of Gwyn’s actions. However, for some reason, it seems to be the Dark Souls game that dabbles the most into cosmic horror.

This game is also the fastest game of the franchise when it comes to gameplay. Considering that shields are weaker, attacks are faster, and a few locations look somewhat like Yharnam, one can see why Dark Souls 3 is the one that is the most like Bloodborne.

In this game, there is a constant feeling of hopelessness. If you think the world felt doomed while playing the previous games, you can actually see the end of time and space by playing this game.

The world is so close to ending for good that you can’t even find undead warriors capable of resurrecting the First Flame. Therefore, to prevent the end of the Age of Fire, some lords and undead were brought back in hopes that there would be souls strong enough to fuel the First Flame.

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